#264 – Beyond Forgiveness, Reflections on Atonement with Phil Cousineau

Transcript

Phil Cousineau is editor of the 2011 book Beyond Forgiveness: Reflections on Atonement. Phil is an award-winning writer and filmmaker, teacher and editor, lecturer and travel leader, storyteller and TV host. His fascination with the art, literature, and history of culture has taken him from Michigan to Marrakesh, Iceland to the Amazon, in a worldwide search for what the ancients called the “soul of the world.” With more than 25 books and 15 scriptwriting credits to his name, the “omnipresent influence of myth in modern life” is a thread that runs through all of his work. His other books include Stoking the Creative Fires, Once and Future Myths, The Art of Pilgrimage, The Olympic Odyssey, The Hero’s Journey, and Wordcatcher.

Discover these discount codes for you!: Angie’s List and 10% off on printer ink at 4inkjets and 10% off on Shoes and other apparel at ShoeBuy.com.

A psychology podcast by David Van Nuys, Ph.D.

Play

One Comment

  1. Peter B. Todd
    Posted May 21, 2011 at 12:28 am | Permalink

    An excellent thesis on the theological and symbolic psychological significance of forgiveness and atonement. Jung himself expressed similar views about the meaning of the “sacrificium” or surrender of one’s finite ego-consciousness to a numinous or transcendent reality in such essays as “Transformation Symbolism in the Mass” and “Christ as a Symbol of the Self” in volumes 9 and 10 of his collected works. I explored these issues in a recent lecture to the C.G. Jung Society of Sydney.

    And the idea that in an Incarnational, process theology, God becomes conscious through and is completed by humankind. The numinous dimension is implicit in evolution itself. The paper is titled, “The Numinous and the Archetypes as Timeless, Cosmic Ordering and Regulating Principles in Evolution”

    Link: http://www.jungdownunder.com/links_main/Speakers_Presentations/Speakers_Presentations.html

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*


+ 5 = eleven